Improving Eyesight with Nutrition

Respectful Living
7 min readApr 16, 2021

The secret to good eyesight as we age may not be a secret after all. The adage that eating your carrots will ensure good eyesight has some truth. Mom may have been right all along! Even though conventional therapies for improving eyesight like eyeglasses, contact lenses, and surgery may be preferred by some, it is evident that proper nutrition and lifestyle modifications may be equally or more effective for the treatment and prevention of vision impairment and loss.

Traditional medical and eye doctors are taught to treat conditions in a disease model. A doctor visit for a health condition will result in a treatment, pharmaceuticals, or other therapy that can be expensive, to alleviate the symptoms a patient is experiencing. A trip to the eye doctor for impaired vision will most likely result in eyeglasses, contact lenses, or possibly LASIK laser surgery. Though these strategies for improving eyesight may be effective, they are neither preventative, nor will they remedy any underlying nutritional deficiencies or other factors that may have caused the vision impairment. Knowing the underlying causes of vision impairment can give us the tools we need to prevent vision loss.

Modern medicine is amazing. If a medical condition requires medical attention, then an appointment with a doctor is in order. Despite all our medical and technological advances, the basics of human nutrition are often forgotten. We are humans and are not machines. We need proper nutrition to keep us healthy and strong instead of costly pills and procedures. Even though proper nutrition is the key to good health, medical professionals are inadequately prepared to offer nutrition advice. Medical students receive on average only 23.9 hours of nutrition education in medical school (Adams, 2006), hence nutrition as a preventative measure or a remedy for a health condition or vision impairment is not usually considered. More emphasis is currently being placed on preventative lifestyle medicine and nutrition education (Macaninch, 2020), nevertheless medical school curriculum has not yet been developed to the point of prevention being the standard care, and the amount of nutrition education for medical students continues to be inadequate (Adams, 2010).

Losing the ability to see clearly is frustrating. We live in a visually oriented world that assumes that…

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